Chris Brogan, Trust Agents and Social Media: Old-Fashioned Common Sense

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of sitting in on a presentation made my Chris Brogan.  Through Thursday you can purchase a DVD of the eventChristine Taylor and JTMar partnered with Stage Post Studios to not only make Chris available in person to several hundred Nashvillians, but they also streamed the event online, including incorporating questions via Twitter and by phone all in real time.  Everyone in attendance also receive an autographed copy of Chris’ new book Trust Agents, written with Julien Smith.

Chris Brogan

Chris Brogan, co-author of Trust Agents

Photo credit, affiliatesummit

The name Chris Brogan has become synonymous with all things social media.  Many consider him to be the authority on the subject and the single best example for individuals desiring to be viewed as thought leaders and influencers and for companies hoping to more intimately connect with customers.

Needless to say, none of us were disappointed.  However, I did find myself continually thinking, “This all sounds so familiar.”  Chris himself mentioned more than once that so much of what works in the online world is truly nothing more than good ol’ fashioned common sense.  Help other people first.

I think Zig Ziglar said it best years ago:  “You can get everything in life you want, if you can just help enough other people get what they want.”  You could even go back a little further.  Remember the Golden Rule?  To paraphrase, it says, in essence, treat other people the way you yourself desire to be treated.  Or, as Chris so succinctly puts it,  exercise some “common sense.”

Julien Smith, co-author of Trust Agents

Julien Smith, co-author of Trust Agents

Photo credit, affiliatesummit

It shouldn’t be hard, right?  Yet every day, each of us finds ourselves interacting with someone who has either failed to understand it, or understands it and is simply choosing to ignore it (maybe, heaven forbid, it’s that person in the mirror).  The best illustration I’ve ever heard that really helped to put this into perspective came from Chris yesterday.

Imagine someone you’re being introduced to for the first time has just reached out to shake your hand.  You oblige and then waste no time as you stick your tongue in their mouth.

As extreme as that sounds, it’s essentially what so many who don’t “get it” are doing every day.  How many times do you receive a friend request on Facebook (or a “follow” on Twitter or, name your platform) from someone you don’t know – and who hasn’t taken the time to even include a personal message of introduction – that is soon followed by a note about what services or product they offer that you might be interested in?

If you’ve ever chatted with someone with experience waiting tables, you’re likely to find they view the Sunday “after church” crowd as one of the worst group of tippers around (at least that’s what my anecdotal research reveals).  In some cases, the waiter or waitress is more likely to find a tract (a plan of salvation) than a tip once the table empties (just what the world needs: Christians who go around sticking their tongues in people’s mouths).

I’m embarrassed to admit that 25 years ago, as a young believer, I actually did this.  Mind you, I left a tip too, but apparently had no problem with leaving a stranger’s eternal destination up to a piece of paper.  As far as I was concerned, I’d fulfilled my obligation.  If the message didn’t sink in, that was their problem.  Investing in people’s lives was hard.  This was so much easier.  “Hurray, I planted another seed,” I told myself.

Did any of them take root?  The evidence is weak at best.  Let’s just say that if and when I get to heaven, I doubt there will be anyone eager to shake my hand.

This post is dedicated to my grandfather, William Otis Holladay, who, at 91, passed away earlier today.  A veteran of World War II, he was the epitome of common sense.  I have no doubt that in heaven, there is a long line ready to greet him.

Don Miller: Tour and New Book

I’m as excited as I’ve been in a long time.  88.7 WAY-FM is partnering with Chaffee Management Group to bring author Donald Miller to Nashville to speak in November.  He’s probably best known for his New York Times best-selling book Blue Like Jazz.

As a book review blogger for Thomas Nelson Publishers, I also confirmed today I’ll be receiving one of just 250 review copies of his new book A Million Miles in a Thousand Years – a review of which you’ll find here on September 29th, the same day the book hits store shelves.

iStock_000008901096XSmall

In the meantime, I thought I’d pass along to you a bit of a sneak peak into what’s in store from Don’s new book.  Feel free to share these materials with your network and, if you’re in the Nashville area, stay tuned to 88.7 WAY-FM for more on where and when you’ll find Don Miller speaking.

Let’s Get Viral

First, Thomas Nelson has taken the liberty of uploading the first 20 pages or so of the book to ScribdScribd is a website that brings the concept of “social” to publishing and describes itself as “the website where more than 60 million people each month discover and share original writings and documents.”

I’ve embedded the Scribd preview below, but you can also visit the site itself (just click the link at the bottom of the Scribd frame or the one in this sentence).  You can also share this with your friends on Facebook, Twitter and more than 30 other social networking sites.

Next comes a three-part YouTube video interview Donald did with Michael Hyatt, CEO at Thomas Nelson.  Don, not to mention Michael, comes across as just a regular, very down-to-earth guy.  If you have dreams of being a writer some day, let Don inspire you to not let go of that dream.



Additionally, there’s this really cool video widget you may have seen me share a few weeks back if you’re a friend of mine on Facebook.  In addition to Facebook, it can be added to your blog’s sidebar, shared via Twitter and as many as a few dozen other places you might frequent online.

[clearspring_widget title=”Donald Miller: Million Miles Tour” wid=”4a71a0d82e788bc1″ pid=”4a9c7e6847e4d1f8″ width=”358″ height=”315″ domain=”widgets.clearspring.com”]

The widget also allows you to download and preview an audio chapter from the book.  If  you prefer, you can even listen right now by linking to my Chirbit profile.

Officially, tickets for Don’s Nashville appearance are set to go on sale from the 88.7 WAY-FM website beginning September 20th.  However, I’m toying with the idea of sneaking the ticket link out a little early either through our Facebook Page, our Twitter account, this blog or all three simultaneously.  Stay Tuned!

What are your thoughts on sneaking the ticket link out early via our social networking sites versus a more public “heads-up” on the air?

The Noticer by Andy Andrews: A Review

The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective.

by Andy Andrews

Thomas Nelson Publishers

_200_350_book50cover1 In a matter of minutes, Jones, as he prefers to be called (no “Mr.” just Jones), can completely disarm the most stubborn stranger he encounters with little more than a few probing questions and several common sense, but often profound, answers.  Upon first meeting Jones, most find themselves asking things like, “Who is this man?  What brought him here at this place and at this time?  And why would he be the least bit interested in talking to me?”  Afterward, they’re left asking, “Where did he go?  How did I survive before he showed up? And will I ever see him again?”

Each of them is at a crossroads.  A choice must be made to either continue down the path they’re currently on or forge a brand new one.  At just the right time, whether at the end of his rope, at the point of despair, or in her greatest time of need, they each meet Jones.

A single man looking for meaning having gone through two failed marriages; a couple trying to remember what it was exactly that first drew them to one another; a seventy-something woman who’s come to the conclusion her usefulness has passed; a young businessman striving so hard for success that he fails to realize what true success really means; all these poignant stories and more make up The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective.

How many times have I wished I had just the right answer, as Jones always seems to, when talking with someone in a seemingly impossible situation.  I’m no Jones, but it’s not unusual in Christian radio (my vocation) or in the world of Christian music in general to encounter, fairly regularly, teenagers, young couples, mothers and fathers, you name it, all looking for that spark, that piece of perfect advice that will be just the dose of confidence they need, not just to function, but to start anew and to make a difference in the lives of others.

Personally, I wish I had this book years ago.  But I believe there is value to be gained from reading it regardless of where you find yourself in life.   I’m at a place now where I have the opportunity to speak into the lives of several just starting their life’s journey.  In fact, while on Facebook just last night, I was able to encourage a former intern using the principals in this very book.  Thank you Andy Andrews.  Here are some of my favorite take-aways from the book The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective:

  • Whatever you focus on increases – “If you set your mind on loss, you are more likely to lose…But a grateful perspective brings happiness and abundance into a person’s life.”
  • Every day, ask yourself this question: “What is it about me that other people would change if they could?” – “Another person’s perspective about you can sometimes be as important as your perspective is about yourself.”
  • A friend who accepts you as you are is dangerous – “A true friend holds you to a higher standard.  A true friend brings out the best in you.”
  • We judge ourselves by our intentions, but we judge others by their actions – “There is no difference in the person who intends to do things differently and the one who never thinks about it in the first place.”
  • And my personal favorite?  Your proof of hope – “If you’re breathing, you are still alive.  If you are alive, then you are still here, physically, on this planet.  If you are still here, then you have not completed what you were put on earth to do.  If you have not completed what you were put on earth to do…that means your very purpose has not yet been fulfilled.  If your purpose has not yet been fulfilled, then the most important part of your life has not yet been lived.  And if the most important part of your life has not yet been lived…”

You’re reading this review so I assume  you’re still breathing.  It’s time to get to work.

The Noticer Project: 5 People That Have Impacted You Most

_140_245_book50coverIf  you’re anything like me, you pretty much suck at noticing your surroundings.  Any time my wife makes a change to something within our home (a new wall hanging, rearranged furniture, a different brand of toothpaste even), it usually requires her pointing it out to me.  Let’s just say I’ve missed my share of “Your new do looks great, honey!” opportunities.

This curse especially makes itself known when I’m trying to locate a specific item around the house – by the way, why does it seem we husbands have a disproportionate amount of trouble with this?  I could be looking for cream or sugar for my coffee.  Maybe it’s a certain pair of socks.  Maybe it’s the milk (probably in the refrigerator).  Whatever it is I’m trying to find, more often than not, it’s right in front of me.  My brain, for some reason, just doesn’t see it.

I have to admit that, as I’ve grown older, I can sometimes allow this blinders-on mentality to creep into my relationships.  If I’m not making a concerted effort to pay attention, needs I should be meeting, or at least helping to meet, can go completely ignored.  And that’s certainly not a habit I want to see get a strong-hold in my life.

I couldn’t help but laugh just a little then, albeit nervously, when I realized the subject matter of the new book The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective; a book I’ve agreed to review in time for it’s release on Tuesday.

I’m especially intrigued though by a campaign the publishers are referring to as The Noticer Project. The site describes the project, in conjunction with the book, as “a worldwide movement to ‘notice’ the 5 most influential people in your life.” The description goes on to say, “Noticing those five people is meant to encourage us to step outside our busy schedules and avoid waiting until a wedding, graduation or even a funeral to take notice of the special, influential people in our lives.” How wonderful is that?

I’ll post my review of The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective tomorrow.  In the meantime, you can enjoy this special video.  It includes several in-character excerpts from the book itself.

Pow! Right Between the Eyes!

One of my favorite books of the last few years is easily Pyromarketing by Greg Stielstra.  In it, he outlines the four main steps in the viral marketing process.

  1. Gather the driest tender
  2. Light it with a match
  3. Fan the flames
  4. Save the coals

pow

In this post, I’d like to highlight step two in particular.  It involves the concept of lowering the barriers to trying your product.  Discounting, offering samples and even giving your product away are all ways of doing this.

One real-world example involves another book and is happening as I write over at Andy Nulman’s blog Pow! Right Between The Eyes!  Andy is giving away not just ten, twenty, or even 100 copies of his new book, but actually 200.  In it he highlights the power of surprise in your marketing efforts.

In my industry, it can be so easy to fall back on what has worked in the past.  Sticking with what’s been proven to work feels a lot safer and takes a lot less effort in the planning stages.

It is my hope that Andy’s book can help me to think more creatively and get outside my comfort zone, assuming I’m one of the 200 he decides to send a copy to.  Upon reading it, I’ll review it here.  Something I hope to do regularly on this blog.

If you are an author and would like me to consider your book for review, please send a review copy to:

Jeff Brown

c/o WAY-FM Media Group, Inc.

1095 W McEwen Dr.

Franklin, TN  37067