Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki: A Review

I’ve been a big fan of Guy’s for years, but I must admit this is the first of his books I’ve gotten around to reading.  And I’m glad I did.

His latest, Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions(affiliate link) is a breeze of a read and one that I found delightful and, well, enchanting.

While some might be quick to simplify the book’s advice  to nothing more than good ol’ common sense, I would argue it is much more than that.  Think of a great mentor you’ve had, or one you hope you might one day have.  If he or she were to put every ounce of advice into one tome and attempt to do so in a way that is relevant in an always-connected-world, well, this might be the book they’d write.

Along the way, Guy references the dozens of books he read and researched while in the process of writing Enchantment.  Many of them I wasn’t familiar with and I plan to dig into several of them soon, as if my list of must-reads wasn’t already long enough.

The single biggest takeaway for me were the two chapters outlining what Guy refers to as “push” and “pull” technologies where push technologies are your presentations, e-mail and Twitter, for example.  Examples of pull technologies on the other hand would be your website, blog, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube pages, though I think Facebook and LinkedIn could also fall into the “push” category.

In these two chapters, he outlines some best practices for utilizing each.  Some of them I’ve seen from Guy before and have actually implemented and used with great success.  While, again, some points made are arguably common sense, I suspect many individuals and organizations still aren’t implementing them.

Throughout, the basic and on-going theme of the book, for me at least, was the idea of altruism.  I could invoke biblical concepts and verses here, as Guy does: put the needs of others before you own, treat others they way you desire to be treated, not only in the real world, but in the virtual one many of us spend so much of our time in these days.  Additionally, Guy’s desire is that this book remain relevant for decades to come, regardless of the inevitable technological changes ahead.  I believe he has succeeded in making it so.

Lastly, I thought I’d take advantage of a couple of resources that might help you in determining if this is a book that is right for you.  Below, you’ll find a relatively short video as well as an infographic.

This video is an abridged version (about 11 minutes) of Guy’s Enchantment speech.

 

 

This infographic does a fine job of summing up the book’s main ideas.

 

Enchantment Infographic

Something I didn’t expect to get out of the book was this little gem (a concept that Guy initially applies to your relationship with your boss):

If your wife asks you to do something, drop everything and do it.  You may not think it’s important, but you aren’t juggling four kids, a career, and several charitable causes.  You may see the big picture, but you don’t see her big picture.

Worth the price of the book, as Guy argues?  I think so.

What are some ways you inject altruism into your daily projects, communication opportunities and the like?  Do you think you’ll pick up this book?

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the Portfolio / Penguin Group (USA).  I was not required to write a positive review.  The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

How to Get a Free Book from Guy Kawasaki

Got this e-mail from Guy yesterday:

A long time ago (1987 exactly), I published my first book, The Macintosh Way. I wrote it because I was bursting with idealistic and pure notions about how a company can change the world, and I wanted to spread the gospel. Here’s what a reader said about it:


It is hard to believe this book is now over 20 years old. Guy Kawasaki does a marvelous job of conveying key traits of effective “Macintosh Way” companies and managers. The key, really, is to do the right thing, the right way. Seems common sense enough, but even 20 years later, it appears as elusive as ever.
(Edward J. Barton)

I recently re-acquired the rights for this book, and I’m making it freely available from the fan page of my upcoming book, Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions. To download The Macintosh Way:

1. Go to the fan page.
2. “Like” the page.
3. Click on The Macintosh Way book cover to download the PDF.

All the best for a great 2011.

Guy Kawasaki

Sweet.  Thanks Mr. Kawasaki!  By the way, Guy’s new book Enchantment releases in March.

Alltop: A Magazine Rack for the Internet

Guy Kawasaki (@guykawasaki on Twitter), best-selling author of The Art of the Start and Reality Check, is changing the world .  And while I can’t say I always agree with his politics, I sure do love his creativity and what he brings to the world wide web.

Last year he launched Alltop (inspired by popurls), a site described as an online magazine rack .  Simply put, it’s a site that aggregates, in a very clean and simple way, the web’s cream of the crop from virtually every topic imaginable.  There’s plenty of useful information to be found on Alltop, not the least of which is great blog post ideas.

fireshot-capture-13-alltop-all-the-top-stories-alltop_com1

You’ll find links to blogs and news sites on topics ranging from Acne to Zoology and virtually everything in between.  Don’t find what you’re looking for?  Suggest to the Alltop crew they add it by sending them an e-mail to info@alltop.com.  You can even submit your own site or blog for inclusion among the topics.  My blog shows up in the radio category.

Sure, there’s Google Search.  And if you’re anything like me, you make use of Google Reader or another feed reader that brings your blog subscriptions right to your doorstep.  So what’s so special about Alltop?  Who uses it?  Why?  Well,  Chris Brogan puts it this way:

Alltop isn’t for you or me. It’s for friends and family and coworkers who aren’t yet surfing at the speed of light with Google Reader, or adding meta commentary via FriendFeed. It’s for our neighbor who still logs into AOL, or people who want to read a sampling of information without a lot of customization.

Now, I consider myself a seasoned surfer, but I find myself often making use of Alltop anyway.  Rather than doing a Google search when I’m researching a particular topic, I go to Alltop first to see if it’s covered there.  If so, I instantly have a dozen or more of the top blogs on that subject at my fingertips.

Are you a Mom interested in what others in your space are writing about?  Then moms.alltop.com is a good place to start.  Want to learn how to make a Caramel Machiatto just like Starbucks?  Try coffee.alltop.com. Looking to hone your writing skills?  Check out writing.alltop.com.

Whether you’re an internet newbie or a seasoned pro, I think you’ll find plenty of benefits at Alltop.

What about you?  Can you think of other ways to use Alltop?